Management of oral & maxillofacial gunshot injuries during the Libyan revolution, case presentations & literature review

Injuries to the head, face, and neck are an important source of mortality and morbidity in combat even though these areas represent only 12% of the body’s surface area. The incidence of head and neck injuries in the 21st century has been reported as 20%, 21% and 40%. 16% quoted for most of the conflicts of the 20th century. Data from the Falklands Campaign and Northen Ireland indicate that 3–8% of all casualties sustained middle or lower third fractures of the facial skeleton. Facial lacerations are the most commonly reported maxillofacial injury in war. Specialists who have expertise in maxillofacial surgery therefore remain an indispensable part of casualty care in modern warfare. Terrorist activity appeared to give rise to more head and neck injury than either rural attack or minor or major conventional war, possibly reflecting preference for this target area in an unsuspecting victim. This paper will describe the Libyan experience in treating the maxillofacial injuries in war-time and will present a series of cases that were treated at Aljala Trauma Hospital in Benghazi 2011.

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Jan 20, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Management of oral & maxillofacial gunshot injuries during the Libyan revolution, case presentations & literature review
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