1: Anatomy of the Periodontium

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Anatomy of the periodontium

Figure 1.1 Longitudinal section through part of a tooth showing healthy periodontal tissues.

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Figure 1.2 Dentogingival fibres, alveolar crest fibres and circular fibres in the gingival connective tissue.

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Figure 1.3 Interdental area showing transeptal and circular fibre groups in the gingival connective tissue.

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Figure 1.4 The periodontal ligament.

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Figure 1.5 Bony fenestration and dehiscence.

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The periodontal tissues form the supporting structures of the teeth. The principal components of the periodontium are shown in Fig. 1.1:

• Gingivae (including epithelium and connective tissue).
• Periodontal ligament.
• Cementum.
• Alveolar bone.

Gingivae

The gingivae in health are pink and firm with a knife-edge appearance, scalloped around the teeth. In certain ethnic groups the gingivae may be pigmented. In health, the gingival margin is a few millimetres coronal to the cement–enamel junction. The gingival sulcus (or crevice) is a shallow groove which may be between 0.5 and 3 mm in depth around a fully erupted tooth. The gingival tissues are keratinised and appear paler pink than sites of non-keratinised oral epithelium.

Gingival epithelium

The gingival epithelium comprises (Fig. 1.1):

• Oral epithelium (OE).
• Oral sulcular epithelium (SE).
• Junctional epithelium (JE).

The gingival sulcus is lined by SE and JE.

 

Oral epithelium

• The OE is an orthokeratinised, stratified, squamous/>

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Jan 14, 2015 | Posted by in Periodontics | Comments Off on 1: Anatomy of the Periodontium
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