Surround Yourself with Experts (and Other Important Advice for a Constructive and Creative Surgical Practice)

and Paolo Biondi2

(1)

Aesthetic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Padova, Italy
(2)

Maxillofacial Surgery, Forlì, Italy
 
Abstract
Why have a chapter that is positioned after the traditional final one, that of the references? The aims of these pages are similar to those of the rest of the book. Clinical facial analysis is vital in planning the treatment, evaluating the outcomes, comparing different strategies, and developing new techniques. In this light, we want to enrich our work with a collection of ideas and suggestions taken from different experiences and lectures, which, as clinical facial analysis undoubtedly is, could be useful for your daily practice. One of the best is “surround yourself with experts.”

Clinical facial analysis is vital in planning the treatment, evaluating the outcomes, comparing different strategies, and developing new techniques. In this light, we want to enrich our work with a collection of ideas and suggestions taken from different experiences and ­lectures, which, as clinical facial analysis undoubtedly is, could be useful for your daily practice. One of the best is “surround yourself with experts.”

16.1 Surround Yourself with Experts

This precious piece of advice came from Richard Carlson. We have tested it many times and have found that it works exceptionally well.
Many are intimidated by successful people and think that they will not be willing to spend time or share their ideas with us. “Nothing could be farther from the truth,” wrote Richard Carlson. “The reality is, accomplished people love it when someone takes an interest in their success; they love to share their wisdom, good ideas, or business secrets. It makes them feel wanted and needed [1].”
Early in our practice, I mailed a small questionnaire about the treatment of a particular facial malformation to five internationally renowned plastic surgeons. All kindly responded and one of them summarized his ideas and guidelines in a few-page syllabus, which we still use.

16.2 The Cost of Complexity

If you are not devoted to breaking up the analysis, planning, and operative work into simple elements and consecutive actions, you must accept the negative extra cost of complexity.

16.3 John F. Kennedy on Myth

Myth: an exaggerated or idealized conception of a person or thing [2].
Do not cultivate within yourself the myth of the perfect analysis, the myth of the perfect aesthetic ratio or rule, the myth of the perfect treatment, the myth of the perfect result, and the myth of the perfect surgeon!
Time and time again we recall John F. Kennedy’s views on myth:

The greatest enemy of truth is very often not the lie – deliberate, contrived, and dishonest, but the myth – persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic.
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Oct 18, 2015 | Posted by in General Dentistry | Comments Off on Surround Yourself with Experts (and Other Important Advice for a Constructive and Creative Surgical Practice)
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