Solitary glomangioma on the chin: A rare case report

Abstract

A 63-year-old man with a 2-year history of a slowly growing mass in the chin area was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dankook University Dental Hospital. Physical examination revealed a 1.2 × 1.0 cm bluish mass in the middle of his chin, which was tentatively diagnosed as a hemangioma. Considering the size and location of the lesion, an excisional biopsy was performed under local anesthesia. Bleeding and other complications were not observed. The results of histopathological examination revealed glomangioma. This study aimed to report a case of solitary glomangioma arising in the chin, which is not the usual location of this tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a solitary glomangioma in the chin area in the oral and maxillofacial surgery literature.

Highlights

  • Glomus tumors are rare benign tumors that consist of 1–2% of all soft tissue tumors.

  • Glomus tumors can be classified into the following three types: solid glomus tumors, glomangiomas, and glomangiomyomas . .

  • Glomangiomas have features of both venous malformation and proliferation of glomus cells .

  • Therefore, glomangiomas arising in the oral and maxillofacial region have the possibility of being diagnosed late or misdiagnosed as a venous malformation or hemangioma. .

Introduction

Glomangiomas, or glomuvenous malformations, are rare cutaneous venous malformations that show glomus cells, along with the venous system in histopathological examination [ ]. Most commonly, they present as solitary lesions in the extremities, especially the subungual region, but they may present elsewhere. However, their occurrence in the oral and maxillofacial region has rarely been reported [ ]. Glomangiomas consist of malformed venous channels lined by multiple layers of glomus cells. These are α-actin-positive cells arranged in solid strains or in one or several perivascular rows. Therefore, glomangiomas have features of both venous malformation and proliferation of glomus cells [ ]. Glomangiomas arising in the oral and maxillofacial region have the possibility of being diagnosed late or misdiagnosed as a venous malformation or hemangioma owing to their rarity and propensity for specific anatomic sites. Herein, we report a rare case of solitary glomangioma on the chin that was clinically diagnosed as hemangioma but was ultimately diagnosed as a solitary glomangioma by histopathological examination.

CASE REPORT

A 63-year-old man was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dankook University Dental Hospital, in June 2020 for a mass in the chin area. The patient had no history of systemic diseases or trauma. No pain was present spontaneously and upon palpation, and the mass had grown gradually over the past 2 years. Clinical examination showed a 1.2 cm bluish, spherical nodule with slight mobility, and no pus discharge or paresthesia was observed ( Fig. 1 A and B). The lesion was clinically diagnosed as a hemangioma. Since the probability of bleeding was minimal considering the location and size of the lesion, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiography were not performed. Excisional biopsy was planned under local anesthesia. Aspiration performed after local anesthesia showed no specific bleeding, and the amount of aspirate was low. Complete excision was performed with secure surgical margins, and hemorrhagic findings were not observed.

Aug 14, 2022 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Solitary glomangioma on the chin: A rare case report
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