SMAS flap and Frey’s clinic and subclinic syndrome: incidence, quality of life and cosmetic results. 11 years of experience

Introduction: SMAS flap (superficial musculoaponeurotic system) appears to decrease the incidence of Frey’s syndrome and improve the cosmetic results of surgery of the parotid gland. There is no known incidence of the subclinical syndrome and its impact on patient’s quality of life.

Patients and methods: We reviewed patients undergoing parotid surgery since 10 months until the start of the study. We rate the clinical Frey Syndrome (CFS), the implication in their quality of life and cosmetic results. We perform the Minor and HDSS test (Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale) to assess the severity of Frey Syndrome.

Results: There were 47 patients available for the study. SMAS was performed in 42.2% of patients. The incidence of CFS was 29.1% (median follow-up = 5.2 years). CFS and Subclinical Frey (SCFS) increases total Frey to 39.6%. The syndrome does not affect the quality of life in 82.7% of patients. SMAS is associated with lower incidence of CFS ( p = 0.034) but not by adding SCFS patients ( p = 3.54). 79.3% of patients were satisfied with the cosmetic result of their surgery, which was not associated with the implementation of SMAS ( p = 9.96).

Discussion: The performance of SMAS was associated with a lower incidence of CFS in our series, but not by adding patients with SCFS. SMAS was not associated with improved cosmetic results. Independently, Frey clinic syndrome does not affect the quality of life of patients, regardless of the SMAS.

Conflict of interest: None declared.

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Jan 27, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on SMAS flap and Frey’s clinic and subclinic syndrome: incidence, quality of life and cosmetic results. 11 years of experience
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