Residents’ journal review

Shear strength of brackets bonded to aged resin composites

Bayram M, Yesilyurt C, Kusgöz A, Ulker M, Nur M. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to aged resin composite surfaces: effect of surface conditioning. Eur J Orthod 2010; e-pub, July 2010

As restorative composite materials improve, the need to bond to existing restorations for orthodontic treatment is likely to increase. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to aged restorative composite resin surfaces treated with various surface-roughening methods. Ninety composite resin discs (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, St Paul, Minn) (6 × 2 mm) were compressed on a glass slide, light-cured, and treated for 300 hours with an accelerated aging procedure. Each disc was randomly assigned to a different prebonding-procedure group: (1) control with no surface treatment, (2) 38% phosphoric acid, (3) 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, (4) airborne aluminum trioxide particle abrasion, (5) sodium bicarbonate particle abrasion, or (6) roughing with a diamond bur. After the prebonding procedure, metal brackets were bonded with adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). All samples were stored in water for 7 days at 37°C and then thermocycled 1000 times (5°C-55°C). Shear bond strength was recorded as the maximum load to debond the brackets. The results showed that treatment with phosphoric acid was not significantly different from no pretreatment. All other treatment methods had significantly better shear bond strengths than did the control, but no statistical differences were found among the 4 other methods. The authors concluded that surface roughening was an effective pretreatment in bonding to aged composite surfaces and that clinically adequate shear bond strengths were found by using either hydrofluoric acid, sodium bicarbonate, aluminum trioxide particle abrasion, or a diamond bur.

Reviewed by Chris Canales

Oral surgery and chronic TMD

Lindenmeyer A, Sutcliffe P, Eghtessad M, Goulden R, Speculand B, Harris M. Oral and maxillofacial surgery and chronic painful temporomandibular disorders—a systematic review. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2010;68:2755-64

Eleven years into the 21st century, chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) continue to be an enigma to health care providers. This systematic review aimed to summarize the available evidence on the relationship between oral surgical procedures and TMD. A comprehensive review of electronic databases and hand-searching of nonelectronic journals were completed. Each article was rated according to a quality-assessment tool. Only articles whose primary aim was to investigate the relationship between TMD and oral surgery were included; specific procedures included impacted third molar extraction, orthognathic surgery, and implant placement. Thirty-two observational studies were deemed acceptable and classified into 2 groups: 9 sought to establish a surgical cause for TMD, and 23 sought to evaluate possible relief of TMD by orthognathic surgical intervention. The heterogeneity of the studies made meta-analysis impossible and highlighted the need for a standard method of TMD assessment and study design. In the articles investigating oral surgical procedures as a possible cause (all retrospective studies), the summary of data yielded no statistically significant causal relationship between third molar extraction and chronic TMD. The overall results of the studies seeking to establish a curative role of orthognathic surgery for TMD were also inconclusive. The authors emphasized the need for well-designed, prospective randomized controlled clinical trials with standardized methodology to better understand the relationship between oral surgical procedures and chronic TMD.

Reviewed by Lindsey Eidson McCarthy

Oral surgery and chronic TMD

Lindenmeyer A, Sutcliffe P, Eghtessad M, Goulden R, Speculand B, Harris M. Oral and maxillofacial surgery and chronic painful temporomandibular disorders—a systematic review. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2010;68:2755-64

Eleven years into the 21st century, chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD) continue to be an enigma to health care providers. This systematic review aimed to summarize the available evidence on the relationship between oral surgical procedures and TMD. A comprehensive review of electronic databases and hand-searching of nonelectronic journals were completed. Each article was rated according to a quality-assessment tool. Only articles whose primary aim was to investigate the relationship between TMD and oral surgery were included; specific procedures included impacted third molar extraction, orthognathic surgery, and implant placement. Thirty-two observational studies were deemed acceptable and classified into 2 groups: 9 sought to establish a surgical cause for TMD, and 23 sought to evaluate possible relief of TMD by orthognathic surgical intervention. The heterogeneity of the studies made meta-analysis impossible and highlighted the need for a standard method of TMD assessment and study design. In the articles investigating oral surgical procedures as a possible cause (all retrospective studies), the summary of data yielded no statistically significant causal relationship between third molar extraction and chronic TMD. The overall results of the studies seeking to establish a curative role of orthognathic surgery for TMD were also inconclusive. The authors emphasized the need for well-designed, prospective randomized controlled clinical trials with standardized methodology to better understand the relationship between oral surgical procedures and chronic TMD.

Reviewed by Lindsey Eidson McCarthy

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Apr 13, 2017 | Posted by in Orthodontics | Comments Off on Residents’ journal review
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