Effect of ice compression on pain after mandibular third molar surgery: a single blind randomized controlled trial

Effect of ice compression on pain after mandibular third molar surgery: a single blind randomized controlled trial

Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of compression with ice and compression alone on pain and quality of life after surgical removal of mandibular third molars.

Material and methods: A prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled study design was chosen. Participants in group A applied 45 min of repeated compression with ice; those in group B applied 45 min of repeated compression without ice (control); and those in group C did not apply any compression. Pain intensity was measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) three times a day for seven days. At day seven, overall pain reduction was scored on a global perceived effect (GPE) scale and a quality-of-life questionnaire was completed.

Results: Ninety-five patients completed the trial. The VAS scores demonstrated a significant pain decrease in groups A and B three days postoperatively. No significant differences were observed between groups A and B. Based on the GPE ratings, in groups A and B more patients indicated that pain was reduced successfully compared to group C, but this was not statistically significant. Quality of life was significantly better for patients in groups A and B compared to group C.

Conclusion: These results demonstrate that compression after surgical removal of mandibular third molars is a valuable method for preventing pain.

Conflict of interest: None declared.

Only gold members can continue reading. Log In or Register to continue

Jan 27, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Effect of ice compression on pain after mandibular third molar surgery: a single blind randomized controlled trial
Premium Wordpress Themes by UFO Themes