Dental Cements

MATERIAL

Zinc Oxide–Eugenol Cement (TempBond): Pastes

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How Supplied

Pastes or powder and liquids

Composition

Zinc oxide, rosin, zinc acetate, and eugenol or mixture of eugenol and other oils

Armamentarium

• Zinc oxide–eugenol cement
• Mixing pad for pastes
• Cement spatula
• Restorative instruments

Directions

For paste systems:

1. Dispense two pastes in equal lengths on a paper mixing pad.
2. Using cement spatula, swirl and whip together pastes vigorously until a homogeneous paste is obtained.
3. Use the side of the spatula to scrape up mixed material and load restoration.
4. Dry area where restoration is to be placed, and then place loaded restoration intraorally.
5. Instruct patient to bite on a gauze square until material is no longer soft or stringy.
6. Clean excess cement from around margin of restoration.

 

imageSpecial Notes/Helpful Hints • Most paste systems are used as temporary cements because of their lack of strength and solubility. • Powder and liquid systems are reinforced and can be used for temporary restorations and intermediate bases. • When using the material as a base, the consistency is similar to pie dough. If too little powder is used, the mixture becomes sticky or tacky. A proper base mix does not stick to instruments, allowing for the material to be condensed into a tooth preparation.

MATERIAL

Zinc Oxide–Eugenol Cement (TempBond): Powder and Liquids

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From Hatrick, Eakle, and Bird, 2011.

How Supplied

Pastes or powder and liquids

Composition

Powder—zinc oxide, rosin, and zinc acetate
Liquid—eugenol or mixture of eugenol and other oils

Armamentarium

• Zinc oxide–eugenol cement
• Glass slab for powder and liquid
• Cement spatula
• Restorative instruments

Directions

For powder and liquid systems:

1. Fluff powder by shaking bottle gently.
2. Measure powder using scoop provided by manufacturer, and dispense onto glass slab.
3. Dispense liquid as droplets onto glass slab.
4. Force powder into liquid, using large increments of powder followed by smaller increments.
5. For cementation, the consistency results in material that can be pulled up into a “1 inch” string when the flat surface of cement spatula is pulled from mixed material.
6. Use the side of the spatula to scrape up mixed material and load restoration.
7. Dry area where restoration is to be placed, and then place loaded restoration intraorally.
8. Instruct patient to bite on a gauze square until material has set and becomes rigid.
9. Clean excess material from around margin of restoration.

 

imageSpecial Notes/Helpful Hints • Most paste systems are used as temporary cements because of their lack of strength and solubility. • Powder and liquid systems are reinforced and can be used for temporary restorations and intermediate bases. • When using the material as a base, the consistency is similar to pie dough. If too little powder is used, the mixture becomes sticky or tacky. A proper base mix does not stick to instruments, allowing for the material to be condensed into a tooth preparation.

MATERIAL

Zinc Phosphate Cement

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From Hatrick, Eakle, and Bird, 2011.

How Supplied

Powder and liquid

Composition

Powder—zinc oxide, magnesium oxide, and pigments
Liquid—phosphoric acid in water

Armamentarium

• Zinc phosphate cement
• Chilled glass slab
• Broad cement spatula
• Restorative instruments

Directions

1. Fluff powder by shaking bottle gently.
2. Measure powder using scoop provided by manufacturer, and dispense onto chilled glass slab.
3. Divide powder into four to six small mounds or increments.
4. Dispense liquid as droplets onto chilled glass slab.
5. Force one increment of powder into liquid and slowly mix for 10 to 15 seconds.
6. Force second increment of powder into liquid and slowly mix for 10 to 15 seconds. Continue to add powder to the mixture in small increments until proper consistency has been reached.
7. For cementation, the consistency results in material that can be pulled up into a “1 inch” string when the flat surface of cement spatula is pulled from mixed material.
8. Use the side of the spatula to scrape up mixed material and load restoration.
9. Dry area where restoration is to be placed, and then place loaded restoration intraorally.
10. Instruct patient to bite on a gauze square until material has set and becomes rigid.
11. Clean excess material from around margin of restoration.

If the material is being used for a base, the consistency will allow for the material to be rolled into a ball. If too little powder is used, the mixture is sticky or tacky. Before placing the base, the ball should be rolled in cement powder to prevent the material from sticking to instruments during placement. A proper base mix does not stick to instruments if the ball of material and instruments are covered with cement powder.

 

imageSpecial Notes/Helpful Hints • A chilled glass slab is essential with use of this material because of the exothermic reaction that occurs during mixing. If the material is mixed over a larger surface area of the chilled glass slab, the slab absorbs the heat from the exothermic reaction. • The material has a low pH until it has set, which causes the material to be irritating to the pulp. Because of the low pH, a varnish is often placed when this material is intended to be used as a base.

MATERIAL

Zinc Polycarboxylate Cement

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How Supplied

Powder and liquid

Composition

Powder—zinc oxide
Liquid—polyacrylic acid in water

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Apr 6, 2015 | Posted by in Dental Materials | Comments Off on Dental Cements
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