Chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible in sickle cell anaemic patient

Published literature indicates that the prevalence of osteomyelitis in sickle cell anaemic patients is up to 29%. While sickle cell osteomyelitis is more commonly seen in long bones, its occurrence in the jaw bones remain relatively rare, with scientific literature reports few cases occurring mainly in young adults. The pathogenesis of jaw osteomyelitis is usually caused by intravascular sickling, which leads to ischaemic infarction and necrosis of bone, which in turn create a favourable environment for bacterial growth from the oral region. Jaw osteomyelitis in sickle cell anaemic patients tends to occur more commonly in mandible with the mandibular molar region being most commonly involved area. This poster presentation describes a clinical case of a 23-years old male sickle cell anaemic patient, who was presented with two months duration of chronic pus discharge from the site of dental extraction. Based on clinical, radiographic and laboratory investigations the diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible was confirmed with involvement of actinomycosis species . The patient was managed by local sequestrectomy, removal of involved teeth and the use of long term antibiotic therapy directed towards the causative micro-organism with a final successful outcome.

Conflict of interest: None declared.

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Feb 5, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Chronic osteomyelitis of the mandible in sickle cell anaemic patient
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