A broad spectrum retrospective study of odontogenic infection pattern and management at a Canadian tertiary care hospital

Objectives: This retrospective study aims at analyzing the aetiology, pattern and management of odontogenic maxillofacial infections (OMI) presenting at the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre.

Methods: A random selection of 72 patients admitted to the OMS Service between 2009 and 2012 with identified OMI were included. Demographic, preadmission, clinical and treatment variables were collected. Associations between variables were statistically evaluated with linear and logistic regression analysis.

Results: Of the 72 patients, 37 (51%) were male and mean age of 36 years. The majority of patients were of low socio-economic status. The most commonly involved space was the submandibular in 52 patients (72%). Primary management in 100% of cases was incision and drainage coupled with IV antibiotics. Forty-nine patients (68%) required extraction with an average of 2.7 teeth removed. IV Clindamycin was used in 59 cases (82%). Length of hospitalization ranged from 1 to 13 days (mean 3.6).

Conclusions: A significant correlation was found between the number of pre-admission days with symptoms and the number of infected spaces. This study suggests that longer hospital stays can be anticipated for patients with increased age, multiple space involvement, and underlying systemic disease.

Key words: odontogenic infection; aetiology; length of hospital stay

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Jan 21, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on A broad spectrum retrospective study of odontogenic infection pattern and management at a Canadian tertiary care hospital
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