21: Intraoral Injections

CHAPTER 21

INTRAORAL INJECTIONS

Overview and Topographic Anatomy

Mandibular Injections

Maxillary Injections

Questions

Overview and Topographic Anatomy

GENERAL INFORMATION

Intraoral injections provide adequate pain control for various dental procedures

Many techniques have been developed

All require detailed understanding of head and neck anatomy to maximize proper administration and minimize complications

Injections should not be performed in areas of infection or inflammation

The application of topical anesthetic to the site of injection will help lessen the pain caused by the insertion of the needle

Classification

Local injections (field blocks)

Nerve blocks

Common Blocks

Mandibular:

Inferior alveolar

Long buccal

Mental

Gow-Gates

Akinosi

Maxillary:

Posterior superior alveolar

Nasopalatine

Greater palatine

Infraorbital

Maxillary division

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Mandibular Injections

INNERVATION AND OSTEOLOGY LANDMARKS

Mandible: General Considerations and Landmarks

The strongest and largest facial bone

Composed of 2 pieces of thick cortical bone: a lingual plate and a buccal plate

Teeth are contained in the horseshoe-shaped body

Ramus extends superiorly from the angle of the mandible

The coronoid notch is the concavity on the anterior portion of the ramus used to estimate the height of the mandibular foramen, which also is located at the height of the occlusal plane

Associated Nerves

Inferior alveolar nerve enters the mandible at the mandibular foramen

Lingual nerve enters the oral cavity passing against the lingual tuberosity

Buccal nerve lies on the buccal shelf

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INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BLOCK

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LONG BUCCAL NERVE BLOCK

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MENTAL NERVE BLOCK

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GOW-GATES BLOCK

Jan 5, 2015 | Posted by in General Dentistry | Comments Off on 21: Intraoral Injections
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