Pre and post adenoid/tonsillectomy craniofacial architecture in a group of children with sleep disordered breathing

Introduction: The skeletal craniofacial morphology is the functional reflection of nearby structures and functional conditions to which it is subjected. Obstruction of the upper airway is common in children and is a cause of sleep-related breathing disorders. Some studies suggest that altered respiratory patterns induce changes in craniofacial architecture. The aim of this study is to compare the craniofacial anatomy in children with sleep disordered breathing before and after adenoid/tonsillectomy.

Methods: 17 patients were selected for this study. Their ages were between 5 and 12 years old before surgery. They were diagnosed with sleep disordered breathing based on an ENT review and the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire survey. Each child underwent an architectural and structural analysis drawn over a cephalometric radiograph prior adenoid/tonsillectomy and 3 years after surgery.

Results: The results showed no significant changes in the craniofacial architecture in those children 3 years after adenoid/tonsillectomy.

Conclusion: The children studied showed no changes in their craniofacial architecture post adenoid/tonsillectomy. This suggests that surgery alone does not correct the skeletal deformation.

Conflict of interest: None declared.

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Jan 27, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Pre and post adenoid/tonsillectomy craniofacial architecture in a group of children with sleep disordered breathing
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