Online only abstracts

Tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusions evaluated with real-time balanced turbo field echo cine magnetic resonance imaging

Serkan Görgülü, Deniz Sağdç, Erol Akin, Şeniz Karaçay, and Nail Bulakbas. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;139:e405-e414

I ntroduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the position and movements of the tongue in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods: Sixty-six patients (31 male, 35 female) with Class III malocclusion were divided into 3 groups according to cephalometric analysis. The first group comprised 23 patients (13 male, 10 female) with mandibular prognathism, the second group comprised 21 patients (9 male, 12 female) with maxillary retrognathism, and the third group comprised 22 patients (9 male, 13 female) with both maxillary retrognathism and mandibular prognathism. Twenty-two skeletal Class I patients (10 male, 12 female) were also included as the control group. Results: Dentofacial morphology affects the position and the movements of the tongue during deglutition. Contact of the anterior portion of the tongue with the rugae area of the hard palate decreased in the Class III malocclusion groups. The posterior portion of the dorsal tongue was positioned more inferiorly, and the root of the tongue was positioned more inferiorly and anteriorly in patients with Class III malocclusion than in the control group. The tip of the tongue was also in a more anterior position in the Class III groups. When the deglutition stages were evaluated, we observed that the manner of bolus transfer was different in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion than in those with skeletal Class I malocclusion. Conclusions: Tongue posture is affected by dentofacial structures, and adaptive changes occur in the tip, dorsum, and root of the tongue. Deglutitive tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion are also different from those with skeletal Class I malocclusion.

Tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion evaluated with real-time balanced turbo field echo cine magnetic resonance imaging

Fatih Ylmaz, Deniz Sağdç, Şeniz Karaçay, Erol Akin, and Nail Bulakbas. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;139:e415-e425

I ntroduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the deglutitive tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion. Methods: Fifty-nine patients (26 male, 33 female) with skeletal Class II relationship were divided into 3 groups according to cephalometric analysis. Group 1 (n = 19) had mandibular retrognathism, group 2 (n = 20) had maxillary prognathism, and group 3 (n = 20) had both mandibular retrognathism and maxillary prognathism. Twenty-two skeletal Class I patients (10 male, 12 female) were also included as the controls. Results: In the mandibular retrusion group, the posterior portion of the dorsal tongue moved downward at stage 2 and upward at stage 3; the root of the dorsal tongue was in an inferior and anterior position at stage 2. In patients with both mandibular retrognathism and maxillary prognathism, the middle portion of the dorsal tongue was positioned superiorly at stage 3 relative to stage 1; the tongue tip was retruded at stage 3 relative to stages 1 and 2. In the control group, the middle portion of dorsal tongue was positioned superiorly at stage 3 relative to stages 1 and 2; the posterior portion of the tongue moved upward at stage 2 and downward at stage 3, and tongue-tip retrusion was observed at stage 2 relative to stage 1. Contact of the anterior portion of the tongue with the rugae area of the hard palate decreased in the Class II malocclusion groups relative to the control group. The middle portion of the dorsal tongue was positioned more superiorly in patients with Class II malocclusion during all stages of deglutition. The root of the tongue was more inferior and anterior, and the tongue tip was retruded in patients with Class II malocclusion compared with the control group. The posterior portion of the dorsal tongue was more inferiorly positioned in patients with mandibular retrusion than in the other Class II groups or the controls. In the third stage of deglutition, this portion of the tongue had a superior position in groups 2 and 3 relative to the control group. Conclusions: Dentofacial morphology affects the position and movements of the tongue during deglutition, and adaptive changes occur in the tip, dorsum, and root of the tongue. Deglutitive tongue movements in patients with a skeletal Class II relationship are different from those with a skeletal Class I relationship.

Tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion evaluated with real-time balanced turbo field echo cine magnetic resonance imaging

Fatih Ylmaz, Deniz Sağdç, Şeniz Karaçay, Erol Akin, and Nail Bulakbas. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;139:e415-e425

I ntroduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the deglutitive tongue movements in patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion. Methods: Fifty-nine patients (26 male, 33 female) with skeletal Class II relationship were divided into 3 groups according to cephalometric analysis. Group 1 (n = 19) had mandibular retrognathism, group 2 (n = 20) had maxillary prognathism, and group 3 (n = 20) had both mandibular retrognathism and maxillary prognathism. Twenty-two skeletal Class I patients (10 male, 12 female) were also included as the controls. Results: In the mandibular retrusion group, the posterior portion of the dorsal tongue moved downward at stage 2 and upward at stage 3; the root of the dorsal tongue was in an inferior and anterior position at stage 2. In patients with both mandibular retrognathism and maxillary prognathism, the middle portion of the dorsal tongue was positioned superiorly at stage 3 relative to stage 1; the tongue tip was retruded at stage 3 relative to stages 1 and 2. In the control group, the middle portion of dorsal tongue was positioned superiorly at stage 3 relative to stages 1 and 2; the posterior portion of the tongue moved upward at stage 2 and downward at stage 3, and tongue-tip retrusion was observed at stage 2 relative to stage 1. Contact of the anterior portion of the tongue with the rugae area of the hard palate decreased in the Class II malocclusion groups relative to the control group. The middle portion of the dorsal tongue was positioned more superiorly in patients with Class II malocclusion during all stages of deglutition. The root of the tongue was more inferior and anterior, and the tongue tip was retruded in patients with Class II malocclusion compared with the control group. The posterior portion of the dorsal tongue was more inferiorly positioned in patients with mandibular retrusion than in the other Class II groups or the controls. In the third stage of deglutition, this portion of the tongue had a superior position in groups 2 and 3 relative to the control group. Conclusions: Dentofacial morphology affects the position and movements of the tongue during deglutition, and adaptive changes occur in the tip, dorsum, and root of the tongue. Deglutitive tongue movements in patients with a skeletal Class II relationship are different from those with a skeletal Class I relationship.

Mixed longitudinal evaluation of masticatory performance in children 6 to 17 years of age

Luz M. Barrera, Peter H. Buschang, Gaylord S. Throckmorton, and Samuel I. Roldán. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;139:e427-e434

I ntroduction: The purposes of this study were to determine (1) how masticatory performance changes with age, (2) whether masticatory performance differs between the sexes, and (3) whether patterns of masticatory performance differ among subjects with various types of malocclusion. Methods: A total of 450 children and adolescents (244 boys, 206 girls) were assigned to 4 age cohorts (ages 6, 9, 12, and 15 years) and followed for 3 consecutive years. The subjects were selected based on having about equal numbers of boys and girls, and about equal numbers of subjects with normal occlusion and Class I and Class II malocclusions. Masticatory performance was assessed by using the artificial food CutterSil (Heraeus Kulze, South Bend, Ind). The peer assessment rating index was used to quantify the severity of the malocclusions. Results: Median particle size (MPS) decreased significantly from 6 to 17 years of age. There were no statistically significant differences in MPS between the 3 occlusal groups, but there were significant sex differences, with girls having smaller MPS than boys. Multilevel analysis showed greater decreases in MPS between 6 and 9 years, and after 12 years of age, than between 9 and 12 years of age. There were no significant correlations between MPS and the weighted peer assessment rating index. MPS showed significant intercorrelations between measures of MPS obtained at years 1, 2, and 3, with correlations tending to be highest for the oldest age cohort. Conclusions: Masticatory performance improves with age, and the changes appear to be influenced by the loss of the deciduous teeth during the late mixed dentition phase of dental development. Although there are limited sex differences in masticatory performance among subjects 6 to 17 years of age, mild forms of Class I and Class II malocclusions have little or no effect on masticatory performance.

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Apr 13, 2017 | Posted by in Orthodontics | Comments Off on Online only abstracts
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