Effect of a novel strontium containing titanium oxide coating on osseointegration: an in vivo study

In this study we took advantage of known impact of strontium (Sr) on bone metabolism and evaluated the effect of sustained supply of Sr on local bone healing. Four distinct surface modifications prepared by a magnetron co-sputtering process with different Sr-release profiles were investigated in a rat model. Four weeks after surgery bone blocks with implants (1.1 mm diameter, 5 mm length), which were inserted bicortically in the femoral shaft, were harvested and subsequently evaluated via histomorphology. Eight implants of each group were analyzed. 8–9% Sr containing surfaces showed statistically significant increase in new bone formation in comparison to the 5.5% Sr containing groups and the reference. In detail data was 14.4% for pure titanium, 22.6% for SrTi 5.5% 1500 nm with 60 min washout, 40.4% for SrTi 5.5% 1500 nm, 47.4% for SrTi 8–9% 1500 nm with 60 min washout and 62.1% for SrTi 8–9% 1500 nm with 20 min washout. No inflammation was found in any of the animals. The development of a new bioactive surface with local supply of strontium is a promising approach for enhancement of bone healing and thereby accelerating osseointegration.

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Jan 20, 2018 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Comments Off on Effect of a novel strontium containing titanium oxide coating on osseointegration: an in vivo study
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