Application of Surgery-First Orthognathic Surgery in Patients with Class III Dentofacial Deformities

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2021

J.-W. Choi, J. Y. LeeThe Surgery-First Orthognathic Approachdoi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7541-9_11

11. Clinical Application of Surgery-First Orthognathic Surgery in Patients with Class III Dentofacial Deformities

Jong-Woo Choi1   and Jang Yeol Lee2  
(1)

Department of Plastic Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (Republic of)
(2)

SmileAgain Orthodontic Center, Seoul, Korea (Republic of)
 
 
Jong-Woo Choi (Corresponding author)
 
Jang Yeol Lee
Keywords

Class IIIClass III dentofacial deformitySFAPrognathismComparison

11.1 Introduction

The conventional dentofacial deformity management sequence, using orthognathic surgery, is presurgical orthodontic treatment, orthognathic surgery, and postsurgical orthodontic treatment. This approach has been the standard for achieving stable and predictable results in correcting dentofacial deformities; few studies have investigated possible modifications to this approach. Although the conventional approach has many advantages, some disadvantages exist, such as the length of the presurgical orthodontic treatment, related delays in orthognathic surgery, and possible aggravation of facial aesthetics during the presurgical period, especially in patients with Class III dentofacial deformities. However, if a surgery-first orthognathic approach is possible, these presurgical drawbacks can be avoided [15].

The presurgical orthodontic treatment aims to reveal the true extent of skeletal discrepancies by correctly positioning teeth in the basal bone, which is done during the dental decompensation process (Fig. 11.1). However, complete decompensation may not be possible because of mastication function and force as well as spontaneous dental compensation, which occurs opposite to the iatrogenic decompensation and makes the postsurgical orthodontic treatment, in addition to presurgical treatment, generally necessary (Fig. 11.2) [610].

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Fig. 11.1

Goals of presurgical orthodontic treatment

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Fig. 11.2

Complete decompensation may not be possible because of mastication function and force as well as spontaneous dental compensation, which occurs opposite to iatrogenic decompensation and makes postsurgical orthodontic treatment, in addition to presurgical treatment, generally necessary

Therefore, we hypothesized that orthognathic surgery followed by postsurgical orthodontics, without any presurgical orthodontics, may be as effective as the standard approach for correcting dentofacial deformities.

When orthognathic surgery is performed without a decompensation procedure, the body’s natural compensatory adaptation process coincides with the postsurgical dental decompensation procedures [1625]. Moreover, if the surgery-first approach is applied with postsurgical orthodontics, a regional accelerated phenomenon (RAP), which is known to facilitate the postsurgical dental movement, might maximize the dental movement effect of the postsurgical orthodontic treatment (Fig. 11.4). Therefore, orthognathic surgery, without presurgical compensation, maybe a valid treatment modality in patients with Class III deformities. Consequently, the surgery-first approach has been performed on our dentofacial patients, since 2007 (Fig. 11.3).

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Fig. 11.3

Our origical concept and design of modern surgery first approach under the name of “Functional Orthognathic Surgery” (The Korean Journal of Clinical Orthodontics. The name, functional orthognathic surgery, meant the the postsurgical orthodontics would be more functional than the presurgical orthodontic treatment. Our group had approached the surgery first approach (SFA) with different concept from Regional accelerated phenonmen (RAP). Our main concept of SFA is the fact that the direction of the postsurgical orthodontic treatment is identical to the natural dental compensation postoperatively. In order to overcome the temporary occlusal instability, the simulation process on the dental model is used including the separation of all teeth, simulating the presurgical orthodontic treatment only on the dental model. This process allows us to estimate not only to see the actual status of the occlusion without presurgical orthodontic treatment, but also the possibility to overcome the temporary occlusal instability. Whether the SFA were applied on the each patients is decided based on this dental model simulation process

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Fig. 11.4

Regional Accelerated Phenomenon (RAP) is known to facilitate the postoperative dental movement and might maximize the dental movement effect in postsurgical orthodontic treatment. However, our group approached SFA with different concept from RAP [1115]

Our surgery-first approach is based on presurgical simulation using a dental model. Although our approach does not require preoperative orthodontic treatment, dental model simulation before the orthognathic surgery provides us with predictions that avoid possible postoperative occlusal instability.

In order to persuade you to understand the efficacy of the surgery-first orthognathic approach, I will address one of investigation with the comparison between the traditional approach and our surgery-first approach [26]. This prospective study investigated the surgical outcomes of 22 standard and 32 surgery-first approaches. The included patients had skeletal Class III deformities and underwent orthognathic surgery between December 2007 and July 2010 at the Seoul Asan Medical Center, University Medical Center (Fig. 11.5). Patients were placed in the surgery-first group after consideration of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The indications were based on presurgical simulations using the dental model. This preoperative simulation setup allowed us to evaluate the possibility of a surgery-first orthognathic approach. In addition, we excluded patients with severe dental crowding, arch discrepancies, syndromic patients, and those with cleft-related dentofacial deformities, based on our presurgical model setup; patients not followed for at least 18 months were also excluded. Patients were not randomized, but cephalometric analyses were used to evaluate the dental and preoperative skeletal parameters of the two groups to validate the intergroup homogeneity of these parameters. Subsequently, changes in cephalometric landmarks, reflecting the vertical and horizontal skeletal patterns and the dental patterns, were compared between the standard and surgery-first groups in the preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 1-year postoperative periods. In the surgery-first approach, presurgical orthodontic treatment was not performed, except for the application of a bracket for intermaxillary fixation. However, simulated surgeries, using a dental model, were performed before surgery to create the appropriate wafer and estimate the extent of the postsurgical orthodontic treatment. This presurgical procedure was a critical step in our surgery-first approach.

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Fig. 11.5

Typical patient with a Class III dentofacial deformity. (a) Symmetry is maintained. (b) Severe dental compensation is noted for the functional occlusion. (c) Prognathic facial profile is camouflaged with the natural dental compensation

The overall procedure was carried out in the following sequence: (1) Preoperatively, the standard model mounting process was performed to assess the patient’s occlusion. (2) In the model setup, teeth that were already adapted to the skeletal discrepancy were simulated and reorganized into their predicted locations. This was done by analyzing, simulating, and separating each tooth in the model, as in the real presurgical orthodontic treatment. (3) Simulation of the actual orthognathic surgery, similar to that for the standard approach, was performed. For example, in Class III cases, the maxillary impaction or advancement and mandibular setback processes were simulated. These processes indicate the possible occlusion outcomes, after presurgical orthodontics and orthognathic surgery, in the model. (4) At this time, if the positioning of the teeth is reverted to that which existed before the presurgical orthodontic treatment on the dental model, using the original teeth model, we get a model reflecting the condition of the teeth before orthognathic surgery, without presurgical orthodontics. This process is referred to as the “surgical temporary occlusion” and is made possible using unique magnetic mounting plates that were designed to produce these changes in the dental model. (5) Based on the simulated model surgery, the intermediate and final wafers used for orthognathic surgery, without presurgical orthodontics, are made (Fig. 11.6).

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Fig. 11.6

Dental model setup in the surgery-first approach is based on the separation of the teeth, mimicking the traditional presurgical orthodontic treatment. (a) Standard model mounting process. (b) Before this procedure, teeth that were already adapted into the skeletal discrepancy were simulated and reorganized into their predicted locations based on the presurgical orthodontic treatment. This process is done with the separation of each tooth from the model and the simulation and reorganization are done in real presurgical orthodontic treatments. (c) Simulation of the actual orthognathic surgery, similar to that of the standard approach, is performed. (d) If we change the dental model into the original dental teeth model, we can visualize the post-orthognathic surgery results without presurgical orthodontics. According to this surgery model, we can create the intermediate and final wafers for the orthognathic surgery

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Mar 5, 2021 | Posted by in Orthodontics | Comments Off on Application of Surgery-First Orthognathic Surgery in Patients with Class III Dentofacial Deformities
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