1: Partially Edentulous Epidemiology, Physiology, and Terminology

CHAPTER 1 Partially Edentulous Epidemiology, Physiology, and Terminology

This textbook focuses on what the clinician should know about partially edentulous patients to appropriately provide comfortable and useful tooth replacements in the form of removable partial dentures. Removable partial dentures are a component of prosthodontics, which denotes the branch of dentistry pertaining to the restoration and maintenance of oral function, comfort, appearance, and health of the patient by the restoration of natural teeth and/or the replacement of missing teeth and craniofacial tissues with artificial substitutes.

Current practice in the management of partial tooth loss involves consideration of various types of prostheses (Figure 1-1). Each type of prosthesis requires the use of various remaining teeth, implants, and/or tissues, and consequently demands appropriate application of knowledge and critical thinking to ensure the best possible outcome given patient needs and desires. Although more than one prosthesis may serve the needs of a patient, any prosthesis should be provided as part of overall management that meets the basic objectives of prosthodontic treatment, which include (1) the elimination of oral disease to the greatest extent possible; (2) the preservation of the health and relationships of the teeth and the health of oral and paraoral structures, which will enhance the removable partial denture design; and (3) the restoration of oral functions that are comfortable, are esthetically pleasing, and do not interfere with the patient’s speech. It is critically important to emphasize that the preservation of health requires proper maintenance of removable partial dentures. To provide a perspective for understanding the impact of removable partial denture prosthodontics, a review of tooth loss and its sequelae, functional restoration with prostheses, and prosthesis use and outcomes is in order.

Familiarity with accepted prosthodontic terminology related to removable partial dentures is necessary. Figures 1-2 and 1-3 provide prosthesis terms related to mandibular and maxillary frameworks, and Appendix A provides a review of selected prosthodontic terms. Additional terminology can be reviewed in The Glossary of Prosthodontic Terms1 and a glossary of accepted terms in all disciplines of dentistry, such as Mosby’s Dental Dictionary, second edition.2

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Figure 1-2 Mandibular framework designed for a partially edentulous arch with a Kennedy Classification II, modification 1 (see Chapter 3). Various component parts of the framework are labeled for identification. Subsequent chapters will describe their function, fabrication, and use. A, Major connector. B, Rests. C, Direct retainer. D, Minor connector. E, Guide plane. F, Indirect retainer.

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Figure 1-3 Maxillary framework designed for a partially edentulous arch with a Kennedy Classification I (see Chapter 3). As in Figure 1-2, component parts are labeled for identification. A, Major connector. B, Rests. C, Direct retainer. D, Minor connector. E, Guide plane. F, Indirect retainer.

Low Risk Upper 3 and lower 4 Maxillary canine, Mandibular 1st premolar   Lower 1, 2, 3 Mandibular central, Lateral incisors, Canines

* If tooth loss parallels caries activity, caries risk may be a proxy for tooth loss.

Data from Klein H, Palmer CE: Studies on Dental Caries: XII. Comparison of the caries susceptibility of th/>

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Jan 17, 2015 | Posted by in Prosthodontics | Comments Off on 1: Partially Edentulous Epidemiology, Physiology, and Terminology
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