Online only abstracts

Treatment outcome analysis of speedy surgical orthodontics for adults with maxillary protrusion

HyeRan Choo, Hyun-A Heo, Hyun-Joong Yoon, Kyu-Rhim Chung, and Seong-Hun Kim. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;140:e251-e262

I ntroduction: The purposes of this study were to quantify the treatment outcomes of speedy surgical orthodontic treatment for adults with maxillary protrusion and to identify the key factors influencing the efficacy of speedy surgical orthodontic biomechanics. Methods: Twenty-four adults with maxillary or bimaxillary protrusion were treated with speedy surgical orthodontics, including maxillary perisegmental corticotomy followed by the orthopedic en-masse retraction against C-palatal miniplate anchorage. The average total treatment time was 20 months (range, 11-42 months). Lateral cephalograms were taken at pretreatment, just after the perisegmental corticotomy, and at posttreatment to evaluate the skeletal and soft-tissue changes. The Pearson correlation analysis was used to identify the relationships between hard-tissue, soft-tissue, and perisegmental corticotomy variables. Results: The maxillary central incisors were retracted by 9.19 ± 0.31 mm and retroclined by 19.73° ± 1.17°. The change of the maxillary alveolar ridge angle was 13.97° ± 1.04°. The extrusion tendency of the retracted maxillary incisors was minimal, measured as 1.17 ± 0.36 mm. The width of the buccal corticotomy showed statistically significant correlations with the angular change of the maxillary central incisors and the maxillary alveolar ridge angle. The retrusion of the maxillary central incisors and the maxillary alveolar ridge angle were the 2 hard-tissue variables that most closely correlated with retrusion of the upper lip. Conclusions: Speedy surgical orthodontic treatment can be an effective modality for adults with severe maxillary protrusion.

Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients

Sona Pabari, David R. Moles, and Susan J. Cunningham. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;140:e263-e272

I ntroduction: In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient’s experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. Methods: This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Results: Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult orthodontic group with previously collected data on orthognathic patients. Conclusions: The motives for adults to seek orthodontic treatment are numerous and varied, whereas psychological traits appear to be closer to those of the general public than to orthognathic patients.

Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients

Sona Pabari, David R. Moles, and Susan J. Cunningham. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2011;140:e263-e272

I ntroduction: In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient’s experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. Methods: This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Results: Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult orthodontic group with previously collected data on orthognathic patients. Conclusions: The motives for adults to seek orthodontic treatment are numerous and varied, whereas psychological traits appear to be closer to those of the general public than to orthognathic patients.

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Apr 10, 2017 | Posted by in Orthodontics | Comments Off on Online only abstracts
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