48 Neurological conditions: Bell palsy, and trigeminal sensory loss

48 Neurological conditions: Bell palsy, and trigeminal sensory loss

Figure 48.1 Bell palsy of left side.

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Table 48.1 Main causes of facial palsy.

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Figure 48.2 Diagnosis of facial palsy. *Brain/skull base.

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Box 48.1 Causes of orofacial sensory loss.

Extracranial

Benign tumors

Malignant neoplasms

Osteomyelitis

Trauma (facial or dental)

Intracranial

Amyloidosis

Aneurysms

Cerebrovascular disease

Connective tissue diseases

Diabetes mellitus

HIV/AIDS

Malignant disease

Multiple sclerosis

Sarcoidosis

Sickle cell anemia

Syphilis

Trauma

Vasculitis

Figure 48.3 Mental nerve sensory loss.

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Bell palsy

Definition: An acute lower motor neurone paralysis (palsy) of the face, representing about 50% of all facial palsies (Table 48.1).

Prevalence (approximate): 1 per 10,000.

Age mainly affected: Young adult.

Gender mainly affected: M = F.

Etiopathogenesis: No local or systemic cause can be identified in Bell palsy (it is idiopathic). There is pressure from inflammation and edema on the facial nerve, usually in the stylomastoid canal, with demyelination. Similar lesions are associated:

  • Usually with herpes simplex virus (HSV).
  • Rarely with another viral infection such as another herpesvirus/>
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Jan 12, 2015 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology | Comments Off on 48 Neurological conditions: Bell palsy, and trigeminal sensory loss
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