40 Salivary conditions: Salivary swelling and salivary excess

40 Salivary conditions: Salivary swelling and salivary excess

Figure 40.1 Diagnosis of salivary swelling.

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Figure 40.2 Causes of drooling.

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Figure 40.3 Drooling in learning impairment.

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Box 40.1 Causes of excess saliva.

Psychogenic (usually)

Painful lesions in the mouth

Drugs or poisoning

Foreign bodies in the mouth

Poor neuromuscular coordination

Others

Table 40.1 Causes of salivary gland swelling.

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Perhaps 700–1000 ml of saliva are produced each day, most by the parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands (major salivary glands).

Parotid saliva makes the bulk of the stimulated saliva and the submandibular gland produces 70% of resting saliva. Mucus glands (minor salivary glands) in the lips, palate and elsewhere produce mainly mucin and immunoglobulin A (IgA). Functions of saliva include facilitating lubrication in the mouth, pharynx and esophagus, and assisting swallowing, speech, digestion (amylase), and defense against infections (mainly IgA, lysozyme and histatins).

Saliva is produced in response to taste, masticatory or psychogenic stimuli. Con/>

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Jan 12, 2015 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology | Comments Off on 40 Salivary conditions: Salivary swelling and salivary excess
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