37 White lesions: Candidosis (candidiasis)

37 White lesions: Candidosis (candidiasis)

Figure 37.1 Causes of white lesions.

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Figure 37.2 White patch diagnosis.

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Figure 37.3 Factors predisposing to candidosis.

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Figure 37.4 Pseudomembranous candidosis.

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Figure 37.5 Candidosis.

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Figure 37.6a Candidosis in HIV/AIDS before wiping with gauze.

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Figure 37.6b Candidosis after wiping with gauze.

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Table 37.1 Causes of oral white lesions.

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White patches may be produced by epithelial debris (e.g. “material alba” – white debris which accumulates where oral hygiene is lacking), sloughing (e.g. burns), or epithelial thickening – rarely inherited but more commonly acquired (Figure 37.1) (Table 37.1). Superficial conditions such as debris or candidosis can be wiped away with a dry gauze (Figure 37.2).

Acute pseudomembranous candidosis

(Also called “thrush” in UK and some other countries.)

Definition: Lesions consist of white flecks, plaques or nodules, which will wipe off with gauze.

Prevalence (approximate): Uncommon.

Age mainly affected: Neonates and adults.

Gender mainly affected: M = F.

Etiopathogenesis: Candida albicans is a harmless commensal yeast in the mouths of nearly 50% of the population (carriers). Oropharyngeal candidosis may be seen in healthy neonates as they have yet to acquire immunity. Local ecological changes such as a disturbance in the oral flora (e.g. by antibiotics, xerostomia), or a decrease in immune defences (e.g. by immunosuppressive treatment or immune defects (HIV/AIDS, leukemias, lymphomas, cancer, diabetes)), can allow Candida to become an opportunistic pathogen (Figure 37.3). There is also an increase in/>

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Jan 12, 2015 | Posted by in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology | Comments Off on 37 White lesions: Candidosis (candidiasis)
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